March 2011 Reads

These are the books I read this March. As usual, there are goldmines, also some duds. I think I’m not the only one who’d wish for juju that will allow you to read just the awesome books. But where would be the fun in that? Hur, seriously, this March was fun—enriching, confusing, fulfilling, leave-you-breathless [with ire/joy]. Here they are:

  1. Next World Novella, by Matthias Politycki.
  2. Journey Into the Past, by Stefan Zweig.
  3. In the Country of Last Things, by Paul Auster.
  4. The Man Who Was Thursday, by G.K. Chesterton.
  5. The Sorrows of Young Werther, by J.W. von Goethe.
  6. Bird by Bird, by Anne Lamott.
  7. The Gospel of Anarchy, by Justin Taylor.
  8. Severance, by Robert Olen Butler.
  9. Our Lady of the Flowers, by Jean Genet.
  10. The Wedding of Zein, by Tayeb Salih.
  11. How to Paint a Dead Man, by Sarah Hall. [01] [02]
  12. This Side of Paradise, by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  13. The Long Ships, by Frans G. Bengtsson.
  14. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, by Arthur Conan Doyle.
  15. 21. In “Seven Skinny Pocket Penguins” post: Innocent House, by P.D. James; Idiot Nation, by Michael Moore; The School Inspector Calls, by Gervase Phinn; 1914: Why the World Went to War, by Niall Ferguson; Death in the Bunker, by Ian Kershaw; The Queen in Hell Close, by Sue Townsend; The Aristocratic Adventurer, by David Cannadine.

Favorites are, undoubtedly, the Politycki-Ball mash-up of palimpsest-y proportions; Zweig’s timidly mournful chronicle of lovers’ what-could-have-been; Butler’s stunning [technique, insight] collection of sentient, severed heads; and, one of my favorite books, charmed-charming bloody Vikings.

Here’s looking at you, April.

Advertisements

3 comments

  1. March was another month of great reading, it seems. I am now off to check out some more of your posts.

  2. I requested Journey into the Past based on your recommendation, and it finally came in at the library. I can’t wait to read it!

    1. I hope you enjoy it. :) It’s my first Zweig, and am just blown away by that quiet earnestness of his. And I owe a lot to the translator, really. Have fun!

Comments?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: