book dump || A Day Into Unemployment

So, job’s done. It was an awesome first job, with a lot of awesome people. I won’t dwell here. But, yeah, it’s done. Which means I am back to spending hours on my bed in the company of books, my Moley, and a bag of Cheetos. Which means there goes my periodic rampages through bookstores. Which means this might just be the last Book Dump post in a while. [Now, where have I heard that before?] Anyhoo, here’s the loot:

  • Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlife, by David Eagleman. Have been reading a tale or two per day, taking my time with it. Definitely reminds me of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams, but more, hm, straightforward. We’ll see how it goes.
  • The Invention of Everything Else, by Samantha Hunt. I would’ve bought it for the title alone.
  • The Slaves of Solitude, by Patrick Hamilton. Since they’re so rare in this country, NYRB titles are almost always auto-buy for me. And the blurb just tickles me.
  • Dimanche and Other Stories, by Iréne Némirovsky. I’ve been working my way through dense and utterly lovely Suite Française for a couple of weeks now — it’s a novel to linger with. I, ravenous short fiction reader, couldn’t resist with this book.

Any thoughts? What’ve you guys been up to?

And, oh, yeah, I’ve missed all of you.

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8 comments

  1. Nice loot. I still have to read Suite Francaise, something hopefully accomplished this year. I have her Le Ball and David Golder on my shelves too. The Invention of everything else sounds so interesting. I would have bought it for the title too! I love great titles.

    What was your job? And what’s that book at the very bottom?

    1. Thank you, Mae. I am still reading SF, but I am liking Nemirovsky so much to go out and buy her short stories. Maybe Fire in the Blood is next, if all goes well? [And that’s actually all I know of Nemirovsky, so thanks for the additions to her booklist, haha.] Invention is about this woman who meets Tesla. That’s kind of, well, awesome, haha. But, really, it was the title that refused to let go of me. :)

      I wrote for a senator running for vice-president. The campaign’s done, so are the elections, and I am back to being a happy-enough bum. :) The book at the bottom is Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin — I needed a stand for my new book loot, haha.

  2. Hi, Sasha! Where’d you get the NYRB book? I was bugging staff at Fully Booked about NYRB titles, and they only had two, which weren’t at the specific branch I was in to boot.

    Fair warning, though. If you tell me where you found it, you can count me as competition.:) (please tell me. pretty please.) Thanks!

    1. Hi, Honey. :) Missed you around these parts, haha. Anyhoo, in NBS Cubao [the giant one], they stock their NYRBs in the ‘Literary Winners’ section. Last time I checked, they had about six different titles, but multiple copies naman. In Fully Booked-Gateway, it’s more difficult bec. FB staff can’t seem to figure out how to stock their stock by publisher. So concentration is required going through books alphabetized by author. I needed a free afternoon, but I found at least five NYRBs stocked in that branch. :) FB-Gateway is where I found The Slaves of Solitude, :]

      And pretty pretty please tell me if you’ve found NYRBs in other places too, haha. Iba nga naman ang sobrang hirap hanapin na mga libro, hehe.

  3. Hey, unemployment is scary as hell, but you do have time to READ!

    I’ve been thinking about reading Sum, but I was scared that it would give me an existential panic attack.

    1. I’ve finished with Sum. And it was good, but I do think that the effusive praise was just laying it on thick. It could’ve been awesome, but my main beef with it was that it got formalistically formulaic fast.

  4. […] it’s a case of [Bibliophilic] It’s Not You, It’s Me. I found a copy of Samantha Hunt‘s novel, The Invention of Everything Else, and bought it because a] […]

  5. […] last half of Suite Française.] Also – Reading begets reading: Halfway through the novel, I bought Némirovsky’s Dimanche and Other Stories. Even then, she and I were clicking — and […]

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