Bye, Mr. Salinger!

I call your WhutFace and raise you a SadFace, J.D. I admit that I never really liked Catcher in the Rye, mostly because Holden himself was a phony (hah)–I read it at nine, and then again at twelve, and then read it again at sixteen (so don’t say I didn’t try). But still, this makes me said. This makes me really sad. :[ Hug. I wish he’d talked to the world more. Ah, the hermit.

Off to look for my mother’s copy of Nine Stories, and Franny and Zooey. And most likely rewatch Finding Forrester. You the man now, dawg.

You’ll be missed, sir. You can now look at all us phonies from heaven.

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10 comments

  1. Hi Sasha,

    It made me sad too.

    I didn’t read C in the R until I was in my thirties. I loved it, but I think I see where you are coming from. It’s weird , to think what might be considered vulnerable and sincere for one generation might be phony for the next. I always think of that with Breakfast at Tiffany’s, but that’s an aside. :)

    Hope you are well!

    1. Hi, Beth. I remember there was an article a while back that reported on how students (as Catcher has become required reading) disliked Holden’s character more and more. Yes, I suppose it’s a generational thing–I know I never thought of the novel as vulnerable and sincere, just, well, angsty and teen-rebel-antics-y. Funny that. I’m feeling guilty about this, haha. Still, there’s no denying what an impact Salinger’s made, whether one actually likes his work or not. :)

  2. Right. I can totally see that. It’s like watching Rebel Without a Cause or The Breakfest Club nowadays. I first watched Rebel Without a Cause in a film class in college and thought…OMG, what a whiner! So not appealing. lol.
    Still, I thought Salinger wrote an edge that I’d never experienced in older literature. It truly did have the taste of depression and…yes, angst for me that crossed the generations.

    1. Exactly. A whiner, that was what I thought–but I know I should read more of him, his other work. I realize that I’m sorry to say that I kept away from Salinger’s books, only because of Holden. But I’m remedying that. I’m stealing my mother’s books this weekend!

  3. I woke up, and the first thing I saw was my brother’s text telling me that Salinger was dead. I was incredibly sad, and I reread “A Perfect Day for a Bananafish”.

    I hate it when writers die.

    1. Which is funny, considering he was such a hermit, and he was 91. But he’s iconic, you know? So, yeah, although I’m not good friend with Catcher, I got a little sad too. :[

      1. I can’t wait for the posthumous works, though! Well, assuming there are / will be.

        1. I know! Although I’m willing to wait. Let the family grieve and mourn privately–and let Salinger be a hermit for a couple more months/years–before us vultures come down on his hidden work. :)

  4. Going to re-read Catcher after Franny & Zooey, but wow, I applaud your will! 3 times, wat.

    1. Because I couldn’t understand why my mother liked it so much, haha. And then she told me, “Do you like Catcher? Because I don’t think I do.” Bah, haha. And the name Zooey makes me giggle. :)

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