July 2010 Reads

For some reason, blogging always seems to flag for me near the end of the month — same thing happened last June. Then again, last June, I was hurtling towards unemployment. This latter end of July, I was plonked into a new job. I have my excuses. But, well, what I hate about not updating this blog is that it almost always means that I’m not reading. Bah. I’ll figure things out soon enough. And I think the reading will pick up once I find my glasses.

So. It was an uneven July — Some books, I feel even now, would reverberate; also, I just know I’m going to reread them again until they fall apart. Others, well, were Meh. I don’t know what irks me more: That a book dare to be Meh, or that a book wouldn’t even give me the satisfaction of tearing it to pieces. Oh well — Here, my July reads:

  1. The New York Trilogy, by Paul Auster.
  2. Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives, by David Eagleman.
  3. How I Became a Famous Novelist, by Steve Hely.
  4. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  5. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer.
  6. Asleep in the Sun, by Adolfo Bioy Casares.
  7. Almost No Memory, by Lydia Davis.
  8. The Invention of Everything Else, by Samantha Hunt.
  9. Suite Française, by Irène Némirovsky.
  10. This Is Where I Leave You, by Jonathan Tropper.
  11. On Writing, by Eudora Welty.
  12. The Cry of the Sloth, by Sam Savage.
  13. Cecilia, by Linda Ferri.
  14. Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen.
  15. The Easter Parade, by Richard Yates.
  16. Bird in Hand, by Christina Baker Kline.

Favorites: [4] [5] [9] [10] and [15] — Yes, reunited with Richard Yates and it’s just so fine, baby.

Elsewhere, Miscellany: [1] Books bought on the first day of unemployment (but I’m employed again, now, hee!) [2] I registered for the BBAW. [3] My review of Asleep in the Sun, by Adolfo Bioy Casares, was for The Philippine Online Chronicles. [4] I reviewed The Secret Lives of People in Love, by Simon Van Booy, also for The Philippine Online Chronicles.

I’m more hopeful for August. Yes, I say that at the beginning of each month. But, well, lots of good books have arrived at S&TS HQ, and most of them can fit in the bag I bring to work (and isn’t that the bag requirement, ladies?) Again, hopeful, hopeful. Time’s the issue, of course. But I can be a devious goat. Bwaha.

Let’s wave at July at it flutters off. Happy August, everyone!

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9 comments

  1. I absolutely loved the Jonathan Safran Foer book, it is the cutest story ever!
    Enjoy reading it!

  2. 5, 9 and 14 are on my to-read list – actually have Suite Francaise and Water for Elephants already, so, I might read one of them in August.

    I loved Gatsby when I read it, so glad you did too.

    Happy August.

  3. 16 books makes a great reading month to me! I’m glad to hear you found a new job :)

  4. And happy August to YOU!

    That’s quite the July stack, right there. A few I loved & at least one (Némirovsky) I’m very much looking forward to.

  5. I say your month of July was pretty glorious — the ‘presence’ of F. Scott Fitzgerald has such power (and Némirovsky and Auster help.) Anyway, happy August.

    1. I know I’m bitching because I’m nitpicking, haha. I want it all fabulous, sadly. :] Happy August to you too, Alex. :]

  6. @ Caroline, anothercookiecrumbles, Iris, Emily:
    Thank you so much. :] Really loved some of the books but the rest, well, too Meh for my taste. But, yes, I’m very very glad that I read some of these books. When they were good, they really blew me away. Foer! Fitzgerald! Nemirovsky! Wee!

  7. Just came across your blog quite randomly and loved it! You’ve got a fabulous way with words, and you make me want to break free from my reader’s block – especially with [5]! Will be lurking =)

    1. Thank you so much, Lena. :]

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